The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests subtracting 500 to 1,000 calories from your usual intake each day to lose at a healthy rate. First, keep a food diary to estimate the number of calories you currently eat, then subtract the calories to determine your weight-loss calorie needs. For example, if you currently eat 2,300 calories a day, to lose 1 to 2 pounds a week you need to reduce your intake to 1,800 calories or 1,300 calories a day, respectively.
Each person loses weight at a different rate. The best thing you can do is set reasonable goals. If your goal is too lofty, it not be reached leaving you disappointed and ready to give up. Often people contact me, disappointed that they lose between 2-3 pounds per week, then I remind them that a weekly average of 2.5 is 120 pounds lost in a year. Try not to look at the short game, look at the long game, it will keep you motivated.
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Preheat oven to 400°. Slice 1 small potato into fry shapes; toss with 1 teaspoon olive oil and 1 teaspoon chili powder. Roast on baking sheet until golden (about 30 minutes). Grill 1 (3-ounce) sirloin steak until desired degree of doneness; slice into thin strips. Fill 6 Romaine lettuce leaves with steak. Top with 1/2 cup thinly sliced red bell pepper; drizzle with 1 tablespoon balsamic vinaigrette.

Staying motivated to lose weight can be tough, but it’s key to weight loss. When we skip a workout or overeat and use the dreaded words “I’ll start again on Monday” or “I’ll start again tomorrow” we are missing a great opportunity to learn and move on, to hit our reset buttons. The single most important lesson I can teach you about weight loss is that everyone messes up. It’s the people who mess up and get over it (aka: hit their reset button) that succeed.
While 1,200 may be the right number for some, it can be super restrictive for others, says Jaclyn London, MS, RD, CDN, Nutrition Director at the Good Housekeeping Institute. Try basing your meals and snacks off this plan and double up on veggies at any opportunity — more fruit at snack time works too! You can also add an extra ounce or two of protein at all meals if you find yourself feeling hungry. The combo of fiber from produce and lean protein makes this an adaptable strategy that’ll help you lose weight safely — one meal (and snack) at a time!
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