A gigantic Farmer’s Market-style salad with a variety of fresh seasonal produce and fresh herbs, such as fresh baby arugula and radicchio, and red wine vinegar sassed up with a little horseradish. Enjoy visiting your local Farmer’s Market every week and asking the vendors, “What’s new and tasty this week? What would make great ingredients for my salad?”
The 3 Day Diet is low calorie, but it certainly is not low-fat, low-salt, or low cholesterol, so it is not a healthy option for most people with certain medical conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, and high cholesterol. If you are overweight, weight loss is key to managing these conditions. But it should be a healthy and sustainable weight loss that includes healthy nutrition and exercise.
The sad truth is that conventional ideas – eat less, run more – do not work long term. Counting calories, exercising for hours every day and trying to ignore your hunger? That’s needless suffering and it wastes your time and precious willpower. It’s weight loss for masochists. Eventually almost everyone gives up. That’s why we have an obesity epidemic. Fortunately there’s a better way.
This company’s latest plan, Turbo 13, promises you’ll lose 13 pounds (and seven inches from your girth) in the first month. When you join Nutrisystem (membership is required), you’ll mix their pre-packaged meals with food you buy at the grocery store. The plan recommends splitting up your meals into a six a day. As with many diet plans, the research backs the short-term results, but there’s little evidence that it works in the long term. Convenience is the biggest pro; cons are the price and the highly processed foods. Nutrisystem is not for you if you are under 18, pregnant, or breastfeeding, or if you have food allergies. For research-backed tips, try these scientifically proven ways you can start losing weight right now.
If you do it right, snacks also make a healthy contribution to your weight-loss plan. Keep them snack-size and know ahead of time when you're going to eat them, such as in between lunch and dinner or after dinner. Keep snack calories to 200 or less. Good options include 2 cups of air-popped popcorn tossed with 12 peanuts; a container of nonfat yogurt with 1/2 cup of unsweetened whole-grain cereal; 2 cups of raw veggies such as broccoli, cucumbers and carrots with 1/4 cup of hummus; or 1 tablespoon of almond butter with a small apple.
Preheat oven to 400°. Slice 1 small potato into fry shapes; toss with 1 teaspoon olive oil and 1 teaspoon chili powder. Roast on baking sheet until golden (about 30 minutes). Grill 1 (3-ounce) sirloin steak until desired degree of doneness; slice into thin strips. Fill 6 Romaine lettuce leaves with steak. Top with 1/2 cup thinly sliced red bell pepper; drizzle with 1 tablespoon balsamic vinaigrette.
A different way of viewing weight loss identifies the problem as not one of consuming too many calories, but rather the way the body accumulates fat after consuming carbohydrates—in particular the role of the hormone insulin. When you eat a meal, carbohydrates from the food enter your bloodstream as glucose. In order to keep your blood sugar levels in check, your body always burns off this glucose before it burns off fat from a meal.
Becky Duffett is a contributing nutrition editor for Fitbit and a lifestyle writer with a passion for eating well. A former Williams-Sonoma cookbook editor and graduate of San Francisco Cooking School, she’s edited dozens of cookbooks and countless recipes. City living has turned her into a spin addict—but she’d still rather be riding a horse. She lives in the cutest neighborhood in San Francisco, spending weekends at the farmers’ market, trying to read at the bakery, and roasting big dinners for friends.
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