Go back to basics. Go through your meal planners and food logs to see what does not match up. Look for possible processed foods or artificial sweeteners in new foods you’ve added to your diet recently. If you’ve stopped logging or planning your meals, take this opportunity to start again. Most often just that one step will pull you out of a plateau.
Meal prep is a simple and easy way to track your food intake. Whether you just want to stay away from over-processed foods and eat healthy to build muscle, lose weight, or simply feel better, meal prep is a great idea. Prepping all, or at least most your meals, ahead of time makes cooking and eating healthy, nutritious food easier and quicker than ordering take out or grabbing some fast food on the go.
A diet plan is one step towards achieving a healthy lifestyle. Fitness and health guidelines give information on how exercise and living an active lifestyle could complement the benefits of eating healthy. Be sure to check important guides such as eating out, lifestyle tips, portion control guides, clinical research and exercise tips to achieve the maximum benefits of enrolling in a diet program.
The trick here is not only to avoid all obvious sources of carbohydrate (sweets, bread, spaghetti, rice, potatoes), but also to be careful with your protein intake. If you eat large amounts of meat, eggs and the like, the excess protein will be converted into glucose in your body. Large amounts of protein can also raise your insulin levels somewhat. This compromises optimal ketosis.
There are many ways to do intermittent fasting — ranging from fasting for a number of hours each day up to an entire 24-hour fasting period one or two times a week. “If you're trying to kick a habit like eating late into the night, then stopping eating earlier in the evening and fasting overnight could be beneficial for you,” says Hultin. “There are many types of intermittent fasting, so ensuring you pick one that works for you and your lifestyle is important.”
Liquid calories could sabotage weight loss success. Soda is an obvious culprit, but fruit juice, energy drinks, alcohol, and other sugary beverages could all also add to weight gain or obesity, according to research. “Sometimes a bottle of iced tea or juice has 2.5 servings,” says Lisa Lillien, founder of HungryGirl.com and author of the book The Hungry Girl Diet. “Read labels and you’ll see it’s just not worth it.” Dr. Bazilian adds that sodas and other fruit “drinks” don’t satisfy hunger—meaning you may eat equal or more in food calories too. These are the quick weight loss tips nutrition pros swear by.
While 1,200 may be the right number for some, it can be super restrictive for others, says Jaclyn London, MS, RD, CDN, Nutrition Director at the Good Housekeeping Institute. Try basing your meals and snacks off this plan and double up on veggies at any opportunity — more fruit at snack time works too! You can also add an extra ounce or two of protein at all meals if you find yourself feeling hungry. The combo of fiber from produce and lean protein makes this an adaptable strategy that’ll help you lose weight safely — one meal (and snack) at a time!
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