Changing your eating habits can be intimidating, I know. It may even feel like you’re leaving everything you love behind. All the midnight snacks, takeouts, sweets…  But, although it may seem like that at first, soon enough you realize that eating healthy will not only make you feel and look good but can also taste darn good!  The key is finding a lifestyle you love (not one you dread) so that you stick to it.
Keep stocked in your refrigerator or freezer a box of veggie burgers (look for low-sodium varieties). Veggie burgers are a much better choice for your waistline and heart than ground meat. Veggie patties have only about half the calories of regular red meat patties, and zero heart-hurting saturated fat. Plus, they’re so easy to cook – just one or two minutes in the microwave. While toasting your whole-wheat bun, take from your pantry a jar of roasted red bell peppers and top your veggie patty with a couple of luscious slices. Smear your bun with a little low-sodium Dijon mustard.
Five different Medifast plans plus one meal of lean protein and non-starchy vegetables will give you a loss of about 11 pounds in eight weeks, according to the company. Although these very low-calorie diet plans are effective in the short term, weight regain is a risk over the long haul. It also depends on processed foods and requires dieters to last through the hunger pangs. The plan is not recommended if you are pregnant, have type 1 diabetes, or have any of these other conditions. Here are 17 tips for getting over a weight-loss plateau.
Consuming protein in the morning will stabilize blood sugar, Sharon Collison, RD, sports dietitian and clinical instructor at the University of Delaware says. “Make sure to have an excellent source of protein with every breakfast such as Greek yogurt, cottage cheese, or two to three eggs,” she says. Eating more protein earlier in the day could also help reduce sugar cravings in the late afternoon, Collison adds.

A favorite of health experts, the DASH diet has the primary goal of limiting sodium and lowering blood pressure, but the bonus is losing weight by shifting to a healthier way of eating. The DASH diet plan advocates building meals around fruits, veggies, whole grains, lean meats, and healthy fats. Evidence demonstrates that the approach is effective, especially when you add in regular exercise. You can improve your results, suggests some research, by adding more lean protein to the diet. This is one of the healthier approaches, and it’s easy to adapt to your needs, though the salt restrictions make eating out tough. Looking for another way? Check out these other weight loss tricks that don’t require diet or exercise.


With this eating style, you’re looking at a lot of menu planning and preparation. A review published in August 2017 in Nutrients suggests the diet could lead to weight loss, but the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics warns the plan could also cause certain nutrient deficiencies, such as in calcium and vitamin D. (3,4) And, therefore, according to an article published in the January–February 2016 issue of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners, anyone at risk for osteoporosis should avoid it. (5)
Preheat oven to 400°. Slice 1 small potato into fry shapes; toss with 1 teaspoon olive oil and 1 teaspoon chili powder. Roast on baking sheet until golden (about 30 minutes). Grill 1 (3-ounce) sirloin steak until desired degree of doneness; slice into thin strips. Fill 6 Romaine lettuce leaves with steak. Top with 1/2 cup thinly sliced red bell pepper; drizzle with 1 tablespoon balsamic vinaigrette.
Who says you shouldn’t eat less than 1800 kcals? Under normal circumstances, the minimum is 1200 for women, 1500 for men, and height and weight have no bearing – these are what the body requires to avoid starvation. This diet is, however, for 7 days only, it is not intended as a long-term weight-loss strategy, so 6 days at less than 1500 won’t do you any harm. You don’t say how tall you are, or what you do for a living, which would also have a bearing on your long-term weight-loss plans. Good luck with it, anyway – it’s not easy
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